City council candidate takes loss well

Bill Ginther [left] waits eagerly for the results of the election with his family and friends at his house on Monday.
Bill Ginther holds his predicted results before the results came in for the city council election. Ginther gathered with his friends and family at his house on Monday.

Bill Ginther holds his predicted results before the results came in for the city council election. Ginther gathered with his friends and family at his house on Monday.

Bill Ginther [left] waits eagerly for the results of the election with his family and friends at his house on Oct. 16.

Bill Ginther, the oldest candidate in Lethbridge’s city council election, was surrounded by friends and family as the polls closed. The room was buzzing with anticipation as everyone waited for the election results.

“If I lose, I’m going to turn off the TV and remove all evidence of my campaign,” Ginther joked to his companions.

This earned a scattered laugh across the room as people commented on taking down his campaign signs before morning.

Ginther went on to comment that he knows his fate has already been decided by God, and that if it’s meant to be it will happen.

“For me, this is simply the matter of if he wants me there, I’ll be there. If he doesn’t, I won’t be. And I’m satisfied with either one,” the man said.

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Ginther’s platform centered around the poor, homeless and those in need of affordable housing.

“There’s been forums galore, meet and greets, e-mails, phone calls and texts about anything and everything from the skunks in the city to raccoons, to the fluoridation of the water. People have asked about everything,” Ginther said in a speech to his supporters before the results came in.

This was Ginther’s first and last crack at a city council position here in Lethbridge. Despite the fact that he will not be part of the council, he still plans to be an active part of the community.

“I’m thankful to be the voice for those who don’t have one.”

Ginther has a relatively good rapport with those he went up against and plans to keep in contact with them so his voice continues to be heard.

He revealed early in the evening that he was not expecting to win, but wanted to bring awareness about the issues in his platform.

“It’s interesting that it becomes really clear that name recognition is the biggest thing. In my estimation, some of the people that were elected were not the most suitable of all the people that were there,” said Ginther.

Both his family and friends chalked this up to uninformed voters. Ginther added that it also could come down to the low amount of people that voted in the first place.

Only 27.11 per cent of the Lethbridge population voted in the 2017 municipal elections. Ginther said that in spite of the percentage, people should celebrate the voters instead of lamenting those who chose not to.

“We need to focus on the young people,” he said, in reference to the voting.

In Ginther’s case, this focus seems to be starting at home.

Two young girls, eager for their chance to vote, attended Ginther’s party on election night. Jordana Ginther, (12) and Cate Guenther, (11) are Ginther’s granddaughters and are already showing interest in Ginther’s political career.

Young Ginther said she prayed for her grandfather’s success, and she knew whatever God’s decision was would be alright. She also told her peers about her papa’s campaign.

Guenther had supported her grandfather in a similar way. “I went to two of his forums. I’ve been telling lots of my friends they should vote for him and telling them lots about him.”

Both girls are excited for the opportunities they will have to vote in the future.

Ginther secured 1.76 per cent of the votes with 2,270 cast in the 2017 election.

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